Cacuaco celebrates 74 years

pesca-cacuaco

Photo courtesy of the Cacuaco Forum Blog.

This month, Cacuaco municipality in Angola celebrates 74 years. In 2013, festivities honored the first chief of Cacuaco, who defended the interests of the land. This year, the regions rare, endangered pelicans are the focus of celebrations.

From DW’s Cacuaco Forum Blog: “The birds live in the saline zone, but are slowly disappearing because of disordered structures that threaten their habitat. Cacuaco Management, with the help of the Ministry of Environment, held an exhibition about the species to sensitize communities to the problem. Visitors watched the pelicans with binoculars. Civil society was also invited to participate in the festivities.” Read more from the Blog here.

Hard life in the ‘mouth of the River’

Abastecimento-de-água-na-Barra-do-Bengo

Photo courtesy of the Cacuaco Forum Blog

Residents of the town of Cacuaco, Angola need water, hospitals, electricity, public transport, recreational areas for children and police patrols in order to meet the needs of the population explosion in the area. The town, located 10 km from the outskirts of Luanda, was originally inhabited mostly by fishermen, and then became the home to displaced migrants during the war. More recently Cacuaco is filling the need of people hoping to realize their dream of home ownership. Read the full story in DW’s Cacuaco Forum blog here.

 

Flood research in Cacuaco, Cazenga and Sambizanga

Flooded courtyard.

Flooded courtyard.

Hello people of Angola English. I’m Massomba Dominique and I work on GIS (Geographic Information System) projects at DW. This work includes storing and manipulating data that I collect in the field in order to prepare maps. I also give training on the basics of programs like ArcMap and GPS to various institutions and interns and make geo-reference maps.

Landslide.

Landslide.

I’m here to talk about my work at DW, specifically about a project that I coordinated in 2006 in collaboration with the authorities of the municipalities of Cacuaco, Cazenga and Sambizanga in Luanda.

Inside a flooded home.

Inside a flooded home.

Our earlier research had some difficulties, because people did not want to cooperate due to the state of their flooded homes. But we were able to carry out the project when we tried again with help from the administration staff, by persistence and by giving residents a detailed explanation of the work we could accomplish (we had many hours of discussion with families).

In front of flooded home.

Working with a family effected by the flooding.

During the project I helped some families with the arrangement of their furniture because of the flooding. The other help I gave was having conversations with families. I told them how to be more careful when choosing the location of the construction of their house, because of flooding and landslides.

For my part I would say that project ended well because I managed to collect data and in some neighborhoods the residents followed the advice. We were also campaigning for redevelopment of their neighborhoods. In some neighborhoods made many friendships with people who liked the work.

Massomba